Monday, May 13, 2013

Gossen Tippa brochure


Readers of my post "Spires and square donuts" were impressed with John Lambert's deluxe case for his Gossen Tippa (above — notice the Tippa logo). John has now sent me these images of a brochure that shows the case.


"Ask for a nonbinding demonstration from Karl Schreiber, Freiburg/Br. Almendweg 27

"The machine weighs only 4 kg, is only 5.7 cm high, measures 30 x 28 cm, and nonetheless is extremely stable and reliable, and sophisticatedly equipped. In short, it is a high-quality typewriter with a normal platen, keys that are secure to the touch, and convenient levers; it has 3 line-spacing options, automatic ribbon reverse, stencil setting, releases for the platen, carriage, and paper, and even a touch adjuster. It is available in pica or pearl [elite] for nearly every language. In addition to the tried and tested sand color, it is also available in black, maroon, light grey, cerulean blue, or ivory white.

"Easy payment terms with minimal down payment up to 18 months!"


"The frame of the Tippa is cast in one piece—so every little screw 'sits' tight and can't be moved. A minimal depression of a key and a universal Schaltring [I'm not sure how to translate this term] permit the fastest writing, with noticeably precise impressions. The silent carriage return is also notable. At least 6 clean copies can easily be achieved. Since a carriage lock keeps the carriage precisely in the middle of the typewriter, it cannot be displaced even inside its case. Control openings in the paper guide show the end of the line. — Together with the elegant, sophisticated leather briefcase, the Tippa becomes a 'flying office.'

"Machine with metal case, DM 325. Special leather briefcase, DM 70.

"Gossen TIPPA: 'always there with you'"

One interesting detail about the Gossen Tippa is that the feed rollers are controlled by two separate levers on left and right. Why?

Thanks, John!


10 comments:

  1. A flying office....what an amazing thing to call this.

    I want to see one of these in cerulean! Interesting how the colour of the briefcase would go well with all the colour options listed. I'm curious how much of a consideration that was.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I imagine the leather deluxe case would have been quite an expensive option. Very smart detailing and John's seems to be in remarkably good condition. Puts Crumplers to shame.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It's such a beautiful case! But thank you for sharing the brochure too. I take it that this Tippa case is one the prized items in in this chap's collection.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for the very nice post. That case is really great. Now I need to look for a Tippa and the case. The Tippa case looks like the most useful of all the typewriter cases I've seen. Quite exquisite too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Certainly must be a pinnacle of the typewriter case, as an entity. Thanks so much for presenting this to everyone!

    ReplyDelete
  6. That is astoundingly cool. That is all.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow thanks!!! This is so awesome!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. That case would certainly be one of the most prized items in my collection if I owned one! A pity there's not a bunch more models with quite such practical, downright sexy cases

    ReplyDelete
  9. Nice work, Richard.
    A similar, early Tippa (sand-colored) with a leather case) is available NOW on eBay Germany (Artikel Nummer 111087656525), but
    a) USA bidders are blocked from bidding .
    b) you have to go onto eBay.de to see it.
    The same was true with my typewriter and the leather case that Richard has profiled here. I asked a prolific eBay typewriter seller from Berlin to put a bid in for me (and to re-ship it to me in the US).

    P.S. With respect to the Tippa available now on eBay Germany: What we call the "paper shelf" or "paper rest" or "paper table" (that is, the flat metal piece behind the platen and used as a "shelf" for erasing mistakes) is shown as having come off and in need of being re-affixed onto the Tippa.

    ReplyDelete