Wednesday, September 18, 2013

alba a4









Georg Sommeregger on the Alba A4

Robert Messenger's Albas


22 comments:

  1. Intriguing look, nice addition to your collection of rarities (:

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  2. That's one heck of a solid looking machine. I have an image of this sitting in a forgotten room in Europe somewhere.

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  3. I know the later Albas were toy typewriters, but this seems to not really fit into that category. I guess it's kind of like the Collegiate ( http://typewriterdatabase.com/19xx-collegiate-typewriter.1248.typewriter ) though it seems to be more well-made.

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    1. The literature that Georg found describes it as a typewriter for young people, students, or apprentices. A transitional machine between toys and the Real Deal, I guess.

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  4. Congrats, another rare addition to your collection. I like the shape, especially the back view. Great color too. Am I right to presume that this is from the 50's?

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    1. I'm going to guess '60s, but really I dunno.

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  5. So interesting! A shiny blue Alba just appeared at an antique market up here in Columbus. I'd never even heard of it before. Interesting machine. Thanks for sharing that, Richard.

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    1. Not sure I can justify it just now. It's one of the toyish ones, and doesn't seem to fit my current to-be-used collection. But it sure was pretty! Tempted, tempted...

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    2. ...and the one locally here is a three-bank variety. That makes a difference. Love this one here, though.

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  6. That is very nice. I like the stylish lip around the typebars.

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  7. Only 7 in the morning, and already 11 comments - must be the time shift. As to the Alba 4, fine machine. MIne is in good shape and nice to type on, so with yours it's a question of tuning. Solid, yet petite describes it very well. I wonder where the name comes from. Will try to find its origin.

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    1. Ancient Italian legend? Supposedly Romulus and Remus were Albans:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alba_Longa

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  8. Cool. Nice addition.
    It really does look petite.
    Does your Alba accommodate 8½" × 11" paper or just the narrower European A4 width?
    The painted scale behind the platen ends at "72" but the chrome paper bail seems to have more tick marks to the left and right of the painted scale. And did these Alba's
    use the common German type pitch of 2.6 mm (not-really-quite 10 cpi)or something else?

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    1. Thanks for these questions, John.

      It does handle 8.5"-wide paper.

      The chrome paper bail has 72 marks, just like the scale, and those are the true limits of the writing line.

      Interestingly, there is no way to set left or right margins. There is a fixed left margin that can be overriden, and no right margin stop at all.

      The pitch is slightly bigger than pica. There are 9 and 2/3 characters per inch.

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  9. That's a funny looking machine. It looks German, very robust. I like the shape and the color on it.

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  10. A very interesting little machine -- in that twilight between "real" and "junior" or "educational" machines. I like it! Congrats on getting it!

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  11. Nice addition to the collection Richard! I wish to add more such machines to my collection (especially Hermes 3000) but it is kind of hard to find.

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  12. "Bare bones..." That'll be Antares' genetics coming through. It is a pretty machine and despite the unending s/n, I'd guess pretty uncommon.

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  13. We few, we happy few, we band of Alba 4 owners.

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