Thursday, March 29, 2012

The Buribunks: Facebook in 1918




PS: I was reminded of this photoshop I created a couple of years ago by another line from Schmitt's story: "The death of an individual is also nothing but such a rat second, which has no content in itself--whether one of happiness or grief--but only in its historical registration."

PPS: "F.K." in the quote about ghosts refers to Franz Kafka, not Friedrich Kittler.


10 comments:

  1. Wow: Carl Schmitt as a precursor to Ernst Bloch and his concept of anticipatory consciousness. We live in the future--or at least the future conditions everything we do. The world is indeed 'quintessentially Buribunkic'. As Nicanor Parra wrote (I'm relying on my bad memory here): "the poet's job is to improve on the blank piece of paper/I doubt it's possible." Yet, of course, it's the thing we all--writers and non-writers alike--try to do.
    Rob

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  2. The only thing we are missing in contemporary society is a presence indexing and judging our twitterings...or are we?

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    1. One such presence is hosting this very blog!

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  3. Ah, Google will trace your every move while on line and the shadow of digital bits on your hard drive will be there for all to find. When using a computer we are not alone.

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  4. Buribunks: Blogs of 1918 as well?

    That photoshop image you made is so provocative.

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  5. Your "Death comes to modern man" collage is greatest art to me. Thank you so much. It's great that philosophy can go by different media, i.e., not necessarily line by line of the written word, but "Ein Bild sagt mehr als 1000 Worte", in this case it captures the whole state and condition of our facebook generation. I am doing long-term research on "death and the internet", btw.

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  6. That's very interesting! I'll have to add it to my reading list.

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  7. Regarding the Hermes 3000 used to type this post, can you give me a sense of which typeface it's using? There are lots of H3ks. . .and I looove this type! Thanks for the feedback.

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    1. I love it too. Hermes called it "Director." You can find a rundown of Hermes typefaces here:
      http://munk.org/typecast/2011/04/24/1964-nomda-blue-book-hermes-font-styles/

      I typed this using a carbon ribbon, so it's extra crisp.

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