Monday, March 5, 2012

Senta model 4









Tension adjustment:



Keyboard lock:






Adwoa's Fraktur Senta

11 comments:

  1. A funny looking and innovative beast to be sure. Adwoa's is labelled Frister & Rossman (sp?), the sewing machine people?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it was made by Frister & Rossmann. They got their start in typewriters with a clone of the Caligraph.

      Delete
  2. Looks like the carriage is a bit over complicated, other than that it looks like a fantastic machine.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ditto what Bill said. I'll admit my eyes widened a lot when I saw it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I aim for: popping eyes!

      Delete
  4. Handsome. I find the tension adjuster quite an interesting feature, it seems unusual for a 1920s machine. Would you say this might be an early version of the Royal QDL "touch control" function?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is the earliest portable I can think of that has such a feature, although the Smith-Corona flattop portables of the early '30s were soon to include it. The particular way it's done on the Senta is a mechanism I haven't seen anywhere else.

      Delete
  5. I like yours! The decal has been very well preserved, and it has a four-bank keyboard, so it is undoubtedly easier to use than the Fraktur. Very nice! I hope you can figure out the ribbon reverse; I've had some issues with mine as well but at least it came with spools I could reuse, so it was just a matter of fiddling with different ways of threading it. You would need the nuts to tighten the spools as well, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aha! Tightening the spools is the solution. I'll see what I can do. Thanks for this.

      Delete
  6. What an interesting machine! You've just given me a new trophy to hunt for... as soon as I can get my Oliver working.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Well, I have to say that my eyes popped out when I saw this machine. It's just amazing... I'd dare to say that this is this first retro-futurist typewriter I've ever seen. It's light years ahead of other machines from the 20's.

    ReplyDelete