Thursday, July 23, 2015

Youd retypes Fariña in Carmel






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... and here's the resulting diptych, as posted by Tim on July 29:



7 comments:

  1. Retyping whole novels? It's the Typospherian equivalent of running a marathon!

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  2. This is great, thanks for highlighting his work. I am surprised that the paper is still in one piece at the end of the novel! His cardboard sculptures of the typewriters( on his website) are great too.

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  3. I had the pleasure of meeting Tim at Jones Typewriter in St. Louis one day. Nice man. Told me about his experience retyping "The Sun Also Rises" on a Corona 3. Said it wasn't much fun because his hands weren't small enough for the keyboard.

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  4. No chance of spotting (let alone correcting) a typo then! I've just been reading of Everett Reuss's adventures in Carmel and elsewhere.

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  5. Hmmn, that actually looks like a good reason to use one of those black/white bichrome "correction" ribbons. Type one page worth in ink, the next in correction, then back to ink, switching for each page and building up a textured layer of ink and correction overstrikes, all piled on top of each other.

    It should be noted that many authors learned how to tell stories by first re-typing favorite novels, to get into practice. I presume they use more than one sheet of paper, but the learning effect would likely be similar regardless if the final result was readable or not. (:

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  6. It's nice to know that Fariña's manuscript was typed on an Olivetti Lettera 32. (:

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  7. I may start typing my typecasts like that. As Rob stated...not able to spot typos.

    Retyping a novel (as I wrote that I thought I should write is a novel idea) sure would be a great way to practice typing, and it would not be as boring as the drills in a typing book.

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