Thursday, February 3, 2011

I adopt a Scandinavian


The rear of the carriage swings back, as on some Smith-Coronas, to reveal the margin settings and paper support.


The line space dial


Intended as a foot, serving as a knob


"M" is for Margin


The ƒ (guilder/florin) key; touch regulator; silicone (?) typebar rest; unique ribbon spool with 9/16" ribbon

A plaque on the back indicates the store that sold the machine.
"Kantoorinstallaties" means "office installations" (machines?) in Dutch.

One big foot.

12 comments:

  1. That's right pretty! Reminds me of an SM-3. If you figure out that left knob problem let me know I have the same thing happening on my Hermes 3000. It's not "loose" but works its way out and won't feed lines, so I have to poke at it all the time.

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  2. The foot as platen knob blends in very well, so good choice. The big "uni-foot" (which immediately brings to mind a picture of Halda hopping along behind her briskly marching four-footed typewriter friends) is a distinctive design feature; and it looks to be in good shape too.

    If I'm not mistaken, the ribbon cover is hinged to swing upward like that of an SM-3 as well.

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  3. Thanks for posting such detailed photos - I helps me understand why I couldn't fit a working ribbon spool with my Halda (same model as yours). I guess I will have to "bastel" a bit.

    Umlauts are not, strictly speaking, accents. However, the "..", when used as trema, would be an accent (as in "Citroën").

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  4. Very nice looking typer there. It does look very similar to a Royal QDL, which, of course, I am in love with:) Love the deep green color as well!

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  5. Have wanted a Halda ever since Chris Beaty (I believe) used one as a chapter-head icon in his NaNoBook "No Plot? No Problem!"

    Beautiful green crinkle finish. Thanks for the detailed pic. I like the peg-board inspired bottom panel.

    Really been intrigued by the Junior, too, after your article (that was yours, wasn't it?) in ETC. Such gorgeous little machines.

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  6. That's a nice green machine! And yes, your Dutch translation is correct. I love that it's got the guilder symbol... that's a neat touch (and wonderfully obsolete!)

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  7. That crinkle paint looks like a bionically verdant lawn. Excellent!

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  8. Richard, I have a green Halda in the shop that I am using as a parts machine.
    The platen knobs are good and I'd be glad to send them to you if you want them. I also like the touch and feel of the Halda. Its a good typer.

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    Replies
    1. Hi. I also happen to have a Halda portable typewriter, manufactured in 1958, with a Greek keyboard. It lacks both ribbon SPOOLS: would it be possible to purchase them from you, if available, please..?!

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    2. I will pass your request on to Tom.

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  9. I just noticed that the keyboard (though not with the same layout) has many of the same symbols that my Dutch Torpedo has.
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3ySruYTb69U/T_HVvWcpPlI/AAAAAAAAAQc/LZ5Xv4JKRss/s1600/phlsphthght-117-6-2june12.JPG

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  10. WOW! that's super beautiful! I just bought one myself, at a local secondhand shop, but also from the firm Blikman&Sartorius. Can you please help me find the serial number? i'm super curious when this machine is made. thanks in advance, (i'll send the one with the 'golden tip' a letter from my first Halda!),

    Francesco (francescoUNDERSCOREgrassottiATmeDOTcom)

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